Home > Journals > Panminerva Medica > Past Issues > Panminerva Medica 2019 December;61(4) > Panminerva Medica 2019 December;61(4):432-8

CURRENT ISSUE
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

eTOC
To subscribe
Submit an article
Recommend to your librarian
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Publication history
Reprints
Permissions
Cite this article as
Share

 

ORIGINAL ARTICLE   

Panminerva Medica 2019 December;61(4):432-8

DOI: 10.23736/S0031-0808.18.03525-5

Copyright © 2018 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Gender differences in clinical characteristics, medical management, risk factor control, and long-term outcome of patients with stable coronary artery disease: from the CORONOR registry

Anne-Laure MADIKA 1, Gilles LEMESLE 2, Nicolas LAMBLIN 2, Thibaud MEURICE 3, Olivier TRICOT 4, Claire MOUNIER-VEHIER 1, Christophe BAUTERS 2

1 University of Lille, CHU Lille, Lille, France; 2 Pasteur Institute, University of Lille, Inserm, CHU Lille, Lille, France; 3 Le Bois Private Hospital, Lille, France; 4 Dunkerque Hospital Center, Dunkerque, France



BACKGROUND: Conflicting information exists about whether sex differences modulate outcome in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Our aim was to analyze baseline characteristics, medical management, risk factor control, and long-term outcome according to gender in patients with stable CAD.
METHODS: We analyzed data from the contemporary multicenter CORONOR registry, which included 4184 consecutive outpatients with stable CAD. Follow-up was performed at 5 years with adjudication of clinical events.
RESULTS: There were 3252 (77.7%) men and 932 (22.3%) women. Women were older than men, more likely to have hypertension, and less likely to smoke. They had more frequent angina but less frequent multivessel CAD. Evidence-based medications were widely used with only few differences according to gender. Women had a poorer control of cardiovascular risk with higher systolic blood pressure and LDL-cholesterol. The composite endpoint - cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or ischemic stroke - occurred in 536 patients. When adjusted for baseline characteristics, five-year outcomes were similar for women and men for the composite endpoint (Hazard ratio [95% confidence interval]: 1.03 [0.81-1.31], P=0.817).
CONCLUSIONS: In contemporary practice, women with stable CAD had a poorer control of cardiovascular risk. However, at 5-year follow-up, cardiovascular outcomes were similar for both genders.


KEY WORDS: Coronary artery disease; Prognosis; Sex

top of page