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REVIEW  LOCAL TREATMENT OF SYNOVITIS Free accessfree

The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2022 December;66(4):293-303

DOI: 10.23736/S1824-4785.22.03470-7

Copyright © 2022 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Radiosynoviorthesis: almost seventy years of experience but still somewhat fameless

Friso M. van der ZANT , Remco J. KNOL, Wouter A. BROOS

Department of Nuclear Medicine, Northwest Clinics, Alkmaar, the Netherlands



Radiosynoviorthesis (RSO) or radiation synovectomy has been practiced for more than half a century, but in many parts of the world, it is still relatively unknown and not used to its full potential in the standard care for chronic, persistent or recurrent synovitis. The working mechanism of RSO is simple yet elegant. Radiopharmaceutical particles are, after injection in the affected synovial joint, gobbled up by phagocytizing subsynovial inflammatory cells. As a consequence, the synovium will be irradiated locally resulting in synovial cell necrosis and inhibition of cell proliferation, which eventually leads to a decrease in the inflammatory response in the joint cavity. In this review RSO is once again brought to the attention and common indications for RSO are discussed. Also, appropriate activities of the administrated radiopharmaceuticals and coadministrated glucocorticoids are provided. Furthermore, a detailed database-assisted chronological overview of published literature of RSO in inflammatory and non-inflammatory diseases, like rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, osteoarthritis and osteochrondomatosis, hemophilic hemarthrosis and pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is provided. Based upon the published literature an indication of level of evidence of RSO is discussed. There is evidence that RSO is effective in persistent synovitis in patients with a variety of causes for synovitis, although the effectiveness seems to decrease over time. In these patients, RSO may not be used to its full potential in many parts of the world. Results in of RSO in hemophilia patients with hemarthrosis are favourable, however the evidence for the effectiveness of RSO in these patients is less firm and mainly based on case series. The evidence for the efficacy of RSO as adjuvant therapy in PVNS is, at best, of very low quality.


KEY WORDS: Synovectomy; Yttrium citrate; Rhenium sulfide

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