Home > Journals > The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging > Past Issues > The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2020 March;64(1) > The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2020 March;64(1):74-84

CURRENT ISSUE
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

eTOC
To subscribe
Submit an article
Recommend to your librarian
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Publication history
Reprints
Permissions
Cite this article as

 

REVIEW  IMAGING INFLAMMATION IN CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES Freefree

The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2020 March;64(1):74-84

DOI: 10.23736/S1824-4785.20.03228-8

Copyright © 2020 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Clinical imaging of cardiovascular inflammation

Claudia CALCAGNO 1, 2, Zahi A. FAYAD 1, 2

1 BioMedical Engineering and Imaging Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA; 2 Department of Radiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA



Cardiovascular disease due to atherosclerosis is the number one cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In the past twenty years, compelling preclinical and clinical data have indicated that a maladaptive inflammatory response plays a crucial role in the development of atherosclerosis initiation and progression in the vasculature, all the way to the onset of life-threatening cardiovascular events. Furthermore, inflammation is key to heart and brain damage and healing after myocardial infarction or stroke. Recent evidence indicates that this interplay between the vasculature, organs target of ischemia and the immune system is mediated by the activation of hematopoietic organs (bone marrow and spleen). In this evolving landscape, non-invasive imaging is becoming more and more essential to support either mechanistic preclinical studies to investigate the role of inflammation in cardiovascular disease (CVD), or as a translational tool to quantify inflammation in the cardiovascular system and hematopoietic organs in patients. In this review paper, we will describe the clinical applications of non-invasive imaging to quantify inflammation in the vasculature, infarcted heart and brain, and hematopoietic organs in patients with cardiovascular disease, with specific focus on [18F]FDG PET and other novel inflammation-specific radiotracers. Furthermore, we will briefly describe the most recent clinical applications of other imaging techniques such as MRI, SPECT, CT, CEUS and OCT in this arena.


KEY WORDS: Atherosclerosis; Positron-emission tomography; Cardiovascular disease

top of page