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REVIEW  IMAGING INFLAMMATION IN CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES 

The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2020 March;64(1):35-50

DOI: 10.23736/S1824-4785.20.03232-X

Copyright © 2020 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Imaging inflammation after myocardial infarction: implications for prognosis and therapeutic guidance

Janette IKING 1, 2, Jasmin KLOSE 1, Magdalena STANISZEWSKA 1, Wolfgang P. FENDLER 1, Ken HERRMANN 1, Christoph RISCHPLER 1

1 Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany; 2 Department of Cardiology I for Coronary and Peripheral Vascular Disease, and Heart Failure, University Hospital Münster, Münster, Germany



Inflammation after myocardial infarction (MI) has been in the focus of cardiovascular research for several years as it influences the remodeling process of the ischemic heart and thereby critically determines the clinical outcome of the patient. Today, it is well appreciated that inflammation is a crucial necessity for the initiation of the natural wound healing process; however, excessive inflammation can have detrimental effects and might result in adverse ventricular remodeling which is associated with an increased risk of heart failure. Newly emerged imaging techniques facilitate the non-invasive assessment of immune cell infiltration into the ischemic myocardium and can provide greater insight into the underlying complex and dynamic repair mechanisms. Molecular imaging of inflammation in the context of MI may help with stratification of patients at high risk of adverse ventricular remodeling post-MI which may be of diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic value. Novel radiopharmaceuticals may additionally provide a way to combine patient monitoring and therapy. In spite of great advances in recent years in the field of imaging sciences, clinicians still need to overcome some obstacles to a wider implementation of inflammation imaging post-MI. This review focuses on inflammation as a molecular imaging target and its potential implication in prognosis and therapeutic guidance.


KEY WORDS: Molecular imaging; Inflammation; Myocardial infarction; Prognosis

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