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REVIEW  RADIOMICS IN MULTIMODALITY IMAGING Freefree

The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2019 December;63(4):355-70

DOI: 10.23736/S1824-4785.19.03192-3

Copyright © 2019 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

CT radiomics and PET radiomics: ready for clinical implementation?

Marta BOGOWICZ 1 , Diem VUONG 1, Martin W. HUELLNER 2, Matea PAVIC 1, Nicolaus ANDRATSCHKE 1, Hubert S. GABRYS 1, Matthias GUCKENBERGER 1, Stephanie TANADINI-LANG 1

1 Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Zurich and University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; 2 Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Zurich and University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland



INTRODUCTION: Today, rapid technical and clinical developments result in an increasing number of treatment options for oncological diseases. Thus, decision support systems are needed to offer the right treatment to the right patient. Imaging biomarkers hold great promise in patient-individual treatment guidance. Routinely performed for diagnosis and staging, imaging datasets are expected to hold more information than used in the clinical practice. Radiomics describes the extraction of a large number of meaningful quantitative features from medical images, such as computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET). Due to the non-invasive nature and ability to capture 3D image-based heterogeneity, radiomic features are potential surrogate markers of the cancer phenotype. Several radiomic studies are published per day, owing to encouraging results of many radiomics-based patient outcome models. Despite this comparably large number of studies, radiomics is mainly studied in proof of principle concept. Hence, a translation of radiomics from a hot topic research field into an essential clinical decision-making tool is lacking, but of high clinical interest.
EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: Herein, we present a literature review addressing the clinical evidence of CT and PET radiomics. An extensive literature review was conducted in PubMed, including papers on robustness and clinical applications.
EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS: We summarize image-modality related influences on the robustness of radiomic features and provide an overview of clinical evidence reported in the literature. Today, more evidence has been provided for CT imaging, however, PET imaging offers the promise of direct imaging of biological processes and functions. We provide a summary of future research directions, which needs to be addressed in order to successfully introduce radiomics into clinical medicine. In comparison to CT, more focus should be directed towards harmonization of PET acquisition and reconstruction protocols, which is important for transferable modelling.
CONCLUSIONS: Both CT and PET radiomics are promising pre-treatment and intra-treatment biomarkers for outcome prediction. Most studies are performed in retrospective setting, however their validation in prospective data collections is ongoing.


KEY WORDS: Decision support techniques; Molecular imaging; Biomarkers

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