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REVIEW  RAI THERAPY IN ADVANCED DIFFERENTIATED THYROID CANCER: FOCUS ON DOSIMETRY 

The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2019 September;63(3):267-70

DOI: 10.23736/S1824-4785.19.03191-1

Copyright © 2019 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Advanced differentiated thyroid cancer: when to stop radioiodine?

Luca GIOVANELLA 1 , Douglas van NOSTRAND 2

1 Clinic for Nuclear Medicine and Competence Centre for Thyroid Diseases, Imaging Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona, Switzerland; 2 Nuclear Medicine Research, MedStar Health Research Institute and Washington Hospital Center, Washington DC, USA



Radioiodine (RAI) is a pivotal important treatment for patients with metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). In order to determine when a patient will no longer respond to RAI, multiple classifications have been described to categorize a patient as RAI refractory (RAI-R). Current classifications, although very useful, are problematic and controversial and cannot be merely applied in the context of individualized patient management. In addition, classifications on how to define RAI-R disease are continuously evolving as more studies are published and managing physicians better understand the limitations and confounding factors of present classifications. Accordingly, each patient should be individually managed with a good understanding of the limitations of the various classifications, assessing the many other factors that affect the patient’s specific clinical situation and delivering appropriate individualized patient care.


KEY WORDS: Thyroid neoplasms; Radioiodine; Therapeutics

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