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REVIEW  HIGH-GRADE GLIOMA 

The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2018 September;62(3):295-302

DOI: 10.23736/S1824-4785.18.03101-1

Copyright © 2018 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Functional magnetic resonance imaging in glioma patients: from clinical applications to future perspectives

Lukas J. VOLZ 1, 2 , Martin KOCHER 3, 4, Philipp LOHMANN 3, Nadim J. SHAH 3, 5, 6, Gereon R. FINK 1, 3, Norbert GALLDIKS 1, 3, 7

1 Department of Neurology, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; 2 SAGE Center for the Study of the Mind and Brain, University of California - Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, USA; 3 Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Jülich Research Center, Jülich, Germany; 4 Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; 5 Department of Neurology, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany; 6 JARA-BRAIN Institute for Translational Medicine (INM-3, -4), Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich, Germany; 7 Center of Integrated Oncology (CIO), Universities of Cologne and Bonn, Cologne, Germany



Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) allows the non-invasive assessment of human brain activity in vivo. In glioma patients, fMRI is frequently used to determine the individual functional anatomy of the motor and language network in a presurgical setting to optimize surgical procedures and prevent extensive damage to functionally eloquent areas. Novel developments based on resting-state fMRI may help to improve presurgical planning for patients which are unable to perform structured tasks and might extend presurgical mapping to include additional functional networks. Recent advances indicate a promising potential for future applications of fMRI in glioma patients which might help to identify neoplastic tissue or predict the long-term functional outcome of individual patients.


KEY WORDS: Glioma - Magnetic resonance imaging - Brain mapping

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