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REVIEW  HIGH-GRADE GLIOMA 

The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2018 September;62(3):225-38

DOI: 10.23736/S1824-4785.18.03096-0

Copyright © 2018 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Overview on current treatment standards in high-grade gliomas

Alessia PELLERINO , Federica FRANCHINO, Riccardo SOFFIETTI, Roberta RUDÀ

Department of Neuro-Oncology, University and City of Health and Science Hospital, Turin, Italy



High-grade gliomas (HGGs) are the most common primary tumors of the central nervous system, which include anaplastic gliomas (grade III) and glioblastomas (GBM, grade IV). Surgery is the mainstay of treatment in HGGs in order to achieve a histological and molecular characterization, as well as relieve neurological symptoms and improve seizure control. Combinations of some molecular factors, such as IDH 1-2 mutations, 1p/19q codeletion and MGMT methylation status, allow to classify different subtypes of gliomas and identify patients with different outcome. The SOC in HGGs consists in a combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy with alkylating agents. Despite this therapeutic approach, tumor recurrence occurs in HGGs, and new surgical debulking, reirradiation or second-line chemotherapy are needed. Considering the poor results in terms of survival, several clinical trials have explored the efficacy and tolerability of antiangiogenic agents, targeted therapies against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and different immunotherapeutic approaches in recurrent and newly-diagnosed GBM, including immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs), and cell- or peptide-based vaccination with unsatisfactory results in term of disease control. In this review we describe the major updates in molecular biology of HGGs according to 2016 WHO Classification, the current management in newly-diagnosed and recurrent GBM and grade III gliomas, and the results of the most relevant clinical trials on targeted agents and immunotherapy.


KEY WORDS: Glioma - Surgical procedures, operative - Temozolomide - Bevacizumab - Clinical trials as topic

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