Home > Journals > The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging > Past Issues > The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2017 June;61(2) > The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2017 June;61(2):181-204

CURRENT ISSUE
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Publication history
Reprints
Cite this article as

THE QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND MOLECULAR IMAGING

A Journal on Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging


A Journal on Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
Affiliated to the Society of Radiopharmaceutical Sciences and to the International Research Group of Immunoscintigraphy
Indexed/Abstracted in: Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 2,481


eTOC

 

REVIEW  NEW TRACERS TO THE CLINIC: TRANSLATIONAL STUDIESFREEfree


The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2017 June;61(2):181-204

DOI: 10.23736/S1824-4785.17.02969-7

Copyright © 2017 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Radiolabeled inorganic nanoparticles for positron emission tomography imaging of cancer: an overview

Rubel CHAKRAVARTY 1, Shreya GOEL 2, Ashutosh DASH 1, Weibo CAI 2, 3, 4, 5

1 Radiopharmaceuticals Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India; 2 Materials Science Program, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USA; 3 Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USA; 4 Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USA; 5 University of Wisconsin, Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI, USA


PDF  


Over the last few years, a plethora of radiolabeled inorganic nanoparticles have been developed and evaluated for their potential use as probes in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of a wide variety of cancers. Inorganic nanoparticles represent an emerging paradigm in molecular imaging probe design, allowing the incorporation of various imaging modalities, targeting ligands, and therapeutic payloads into a single vector. A major challenge in this endeavor is to develop disease-specific nanoparticles with facile and robust radiolabeling strategies. Also, the radiolabeled nanoparticles should demonstrate adequate in vitro and in vivo stability, enhanced sensitivity for detection of disease at an early stage, optimized in vivo pharmacokinetics for reduced non-specific organ uptake, and improved targeting for achieving high efficacy. Owing to these challenges and other technological and regulatory issues, only a single radiolabeled nanoparticle formulation, namely “C-dots” (Cornell dots), has found its way into clinical trials thus far. This review describes the available options for radiolabeling of nanoparticles and summarizes the recent developments in PET imaging of cancer in preclinical and clinical settings using radiolabeled nanoparticles as probes. The key considerations toward clinical translation of these novel PET imaging probes are discussed, which will be beneficial for advancement of the field.


KEY WORDS: Neoplasms - Molecular imaging - Nanoparticles - Positron-emission tomography - Theranostic nanomedicine

top of page

Publication History

Issue published online: March 22, 2017
Article first published online: January 26, 2017

Cite this article as

Chakravarty R, Goel S, Dash A, Cai W. Radiolabeled inorganic nanoparticles for positron emission tomography imaging of cancer: an overview. Q J Nucl Med Mol Imaging 2017;61:181-204. DOI: 10.23736/S1824-4785.17.02969-7

Corresponding author e-mail

rubelc@barc.gov.in