Home > Journals > The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging > Past Issues > The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2004 June;48(2) > The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2004 June;48(2):96-108

CURRENT ISSUE
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

eTOC
To subscribe
Submit an article
Recommend to your librarian
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Reprints
Permissions

 

  NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND ONCOLOGY 

The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2004 June;48(2):96-108

Copyright © 2009 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Position of positron emission tomography and other imaging diagnostic modalities in esophageal cancer

Flamen P. 1, Lerut T. 2, Haustermans K. 3, Van Cutsem E. 4, Mortelmans L. 1

1 Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Leuven Leuven, Belgium 2 Department of Thoracic Surgery University Hospital Leuven, Leuven, Belgium 3 Department of Radiotherapy University Hospital Leuven, Leuven, Belgium 4 Department of Internal Medicine/Digestive Oncology University Hospital Leuven, Leuven, Belgium


PDF


Positron emission tomography (PET) using the positron emitting glucose analogue 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) has emerged as a useful metabolism-based wholebody imaging tool for gastro-esophageal cancer diagnosis and follow up. Most large cancer centers worldwide are now equipped for PET (or even PET-CT). Therefore, there is a growing need for a clear definition of the relative position of PET within the currenly available diagnostic modalities. Significant scientific data indicate that FDG-PET adds clinically useful information to the information obtained by standard means (mainly CT and endoscopic ultrasound) throughout the different phases of clinical patient management: 1) at initial diagnosis: PET detects more frequently distant lymph node involvement and organ metastases compared to conventional diagnostics, allowing a more accurate selection of the most appropriate treatment; 2) during chemotherapy: semi-quantitative FDG-PET allows early identification of non-responding patients. Indeed, the metabolic response as measured by serial FDG-PET can be used to predict the clinical and histopathological response. Moreover, the PET-response seems to be related to overall and disease free survival; 3) after a treatment: FDG-PET allows accurate assessment of the residual tumor load; 4) in the follow up: FDG-PET allows accurate detection and restaging of recurrent disease.

top of page