Home > Journals > Journal of Neurosurgical Sciences > Past Issues > Articles online first > Journal of Neurosurgical Sciences 2021 Nov 11

CURRENT ISSUE
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

eTOC
To subscribe PROMO
Submit an article
Recommend to your librarian
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Publication history
Reprints
Permissions
Cite this article as
Share

 

 

Journal of Neurosurgical Sciences 2021 Nov 11

DOI: 10.23736/S0390-5616.21.05468-0

Copyright © 2021 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Pulmonary injury as a predictor of cerebral hypoxia in traumatic brain injury: from physiology to physiopathology

Laura ACEVEDO-AGUILAR 1, Gustavo GAITÁN-HERRERA 1, Randy REINA-RIVERO 1, Ivan D. LOZADA-MARTÍNEZ 1, 2, 3, 4 , Anyull BOHORQUEZ-CABALLERO 4, Natalia PAÉZ-ESCALLÓN 5, Maria D. Del PILAR ZAMBRANO-ARENAS 5, Michael G. ORTEGA-SIERRA 6, Luis R. MOSCOTE-SALAZAR 1, 2, 3, Tariq JANJUA 7

1 Medical and Surgical Research Center, School of Medicine, University of Cartagena, Cartagena, Colombia; 2 Colombian Clinical Research Group in Neurocritical Care, School of Medicine, University of Cartagena, Cartagena, Colombia; 3 Latin American Council of Neurocritical Care, Cartagena, Colombia; 4 Future Surgeons Chapter, Colombian Surgery Association, Bogotá, Colombia; 5 School of Medicine, El Bosque University, Bogotá, Colombia; 7 Medical and Surgical Research Center, School of Medicine, Corporación Universitaria Rafael Nuñez, Cartagena, Colombia; 8 Intensive Care, Regions Hospital, Saint Paul, MN, USA


PDF


Traumatic brain injury is caused by mechanical forces impacting the skull and its internal structures and constitutes one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality in the world. Clinically, severe traumatic brain injury is associated with the development of acute lung injury and so far, few studies have evaluated the cellular, molecular and immunological mechanisms involved in this pathophysiological process. Knowing and investigating these mechanisms allows us to correlate pulmonary injury as a predictor of cerebral hypoxia in traumatic brain injury and to use this finding in decision making during clinical practice. This review aims to provide evidence on the importance of the pathophysiology of traumatic brain injury-acute lung injury, and thus confirm its role as a predictor of cerebral hypoxia, helping to establish an appropriate therapeutic strategy to improve functional outcomes and reduce mortality.


KEY WORDS: Lung injury; Traumatic brain injuries; Inflammasomes; Brain hypoxia; Ischemia; Hyperbaric oxygenation

top of page