Home > Journals > Journal of Neurosurgical Sciences > Past Issues > Journal of Neurosurgical Sciences 1999 June;43(2) > Journal of Neurosurgical Sciences 1999 June;43(2):135-9

CURRENT ISSUE
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

eTOC
To subscribe
Submit an article
Recommend to your librarian
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Reprints

 

ORIGINAL ARTICLES   

Journal of Neurosurgical Sciences 1999 June;43(2):135-9

Copyright © 1999 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Intramedullary increased MR signal intensity and its relation to clinical features in cervical myelopathy

Puzzilli F., MAstronardi L., Ruggeri A., Lunardi P.

Department of Neurological Sciences, Neurosurgery II, University “La Sapienza”, Rome, Italy


PDF


Back­ground. Are­as of intra­me­dul­lary hyper­intensity in ­patients ­with cer­vi­cal spon­dy­log­e­net­ic mye­lop­a­thy (­CSM) ­have ­been ­described ­and stud­ied by sev­er­al ­authors.
Meth­ods. In ­the ­present ­study, 100 ­patients ­were reap­praised ­and divid­ed ­into 2 ­groups accord­ing to wheth­er or ­not ­MRI detect­ed are­as of hyper­in­ten­sity on T2-weight­ed imag­es.
­Results. Sta­tis­ti­cal anal­y­sis dem­on­strat­ed ­that intra­me­dul­lary hyper­in­ten­sity is ­most fre­quent­ly asso­ciat­ed ­with ­severe impair­ment of deam­bu­la­tion, mus­cu­lar hypo­to­nus-hypo­tro­phy ­and hypo­es­the­sias of ­the ­upper ­limbs.
Con­clu­sions. ­These radio­log­i­cal find­ings prob­ably cor­re­spond to var­i­ous ­types of ­lesions ­which, ­when irre­ver­sible, ­may influ­ence post­op­er­a­tive neu­ro­log­i­cal recov­ery.

top of page