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Minerva Urology and Nephrology 2021 Mar 29

DOI: 10.23736/S2724-6051.21.04144-8

Copyright © 2021 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Penile allotransplantation: early outcomes from reported cases and survivorship considerations

Taylor P. KOHN 1, Vanessa PEÑA1, Richard J. REDETT 3rd 2, Arthur L. BURNETT 1

1 The Brady Urological Institute, The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore MD, USA; 2 Vascularized Composite Allotransplantation (VCA) Laboratory, Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA


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Vascular composite allografts are at the forefront of medical and surgical innovation. With this new technique and the ability to transplant a face, hands, an abdominal wall, a uterus, or even a penis, patients can undergo operations that may drastically improve their quality of life. Although this process presents significant opportunities it is not always an easy road and requires significant upfront counseling and life-long immunosuppression. Often the recovery course is long, with functionality taking months to years to gain. Immunosuppression must be used to prevent rejection of the allograft although it has serious long-term side-effects. Only five patients have undergone penile allotransplantation, but reported outcomes from these small numbers have nonetheless offered significant lessons with each patient. While the operation is still in its infancy, it is certain that shared experiences by surgical teams will yield improved outcomes in the future.


KEY WORDS: Penis; Transplant, allograft; Care, postoperative; Vascularized composite allotransplantation

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