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  XVI CONGRESS DELLA SOCIETÀ ITALIANA DI NEFROLOGIA SEZIONE PIEMONTE-VALLE D’AOSTA
Castello di Rivoli, Rivoli (TO) October 10, 1998
 

Minerva Urologica e Nefrologica 2000 September;52(3):167-71

Copyright © 2000 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: Italian

Conservative treatment of nephroptosis

Boccardo G., Ettari G., De Prisco O., Maurino D.

ASL 16 Mondovì-Ceva - Piemonte UOA di Nefrologia e Dialisi


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Background. Nephroptosis or floating kidney is an acquired, caudal displacement of one or both kidneys, with differing stages and etiology. It has been almost completely ignored over the past few years. The general tendency to regard nephroptosis as a urological pathology has prompted researchers to look for resolutive surgical treatment. The existence of over 150 surgical techniques is a clear demonstration of the high failure rate with the result that surgeons are unwilling to tackle this pathology, often leaving the patient alone with his problems. The numerous nephrological complications caused by nephroptosis have prompted us to look for alternative therapies to propose to nephrologists for the consecutive treatment of the floating kidney, enabling the patient to live with his pathology.
Methods. A longitudinal study was performed for 60 months in 102 patients with mono or bilateral nephroptosis. Hematuria, urinary cylindroids, asthenia, pain and the daily intake of antispastic lenitives were analysed at 6, 12, 24 and 60 months. Throughout this period all patients were treated with a water cure (3 1/day) and nocturnal decubitus in Trendelenburg’s position (the foot of the bed is raised by 10 cm). Patients with primary or secondary kidney pathology, UTI and nephrolithiasis were excluded from the study.
Results. All the parameters showed a marked and steady improvement. At one year, over half the patients treated had improved, and at two years over two thirds only complained of marginal symptoms.
Conclusions. Quali-quantitative and temporal values are reported in the light of which we can affirm that conservative treatment enables the patient to lead an almost normal life, as well as returning to work, with a reduced risk of complications.

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