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Minerva Surgery 2021 Aug 02

DOI: 10.23736/S2724-5691.21.08898-5

Copyright © 2021 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Current practice of thyroid surgery in Germany: a nationwide survey

Christina LENSCHOW 1 , Stephan RINSCHEN 2, Kirsten LINDNER 3, Mario COLOMBO-BENKMANN 4

1 Department of General, Visceral, Transplantation, Vascular and Pediatric Surgery, University Hospital Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg, Germany; 2 Department of Internal Medicine, Evangelisches Krankenhaus Münster, Münster, Germany; 3 LAKUMED, Department of Endocrine Surgery, Vilsbiburg, Germany; 4 University of Münster, Münster, Germany


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BACKGROUND: Due to the lack of perioperative standards in thyroid surgery, this study aimed to evaluate the perioperative management and wound closure techniques used in a nationwide survey.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: A questionnaire evaluating preferred technique in thyroid resection, postoperative management, and the occurrence of complications was sent to all hospitals in Germany performing more than 50 thyroid operations p.a. (n=362, response rate 78% (n=283)). Subsequently, hospitals were subdivided into university and maximum care hospitals (Category A, n=54) and tertiary hospitals and basic care hospitals (Category B, n=229).
RESULTS: 10.6% of the hospitals were certified as a center for thyroid surgery, with a significantly higher percentage in Category A (20.4% vs. 8.3%; p<0.01). Concerning the surgical techniques, Kocher´s incision was the favored cervical approach in 96% of the hospitals. A minimally invasive approach was performed in 30.1%, with a significantly more common description in category A. 97.8% of all clinics stated that they perform a platysma muscle suture, primarily as a single stitch interrupted. Skin closure was predominantly performed via intracutaneous suture in 84.5% using absorbable suture material in 63.1%. There was no difference in the technology used in terms of hospital size. The mean in-hospital stay was significantly shorter in Category A hospitals (p=0.035).
CONCLUSIONS: The suture technique used in thyroid surgery in Germany is a simple interrupted suture technique for platysma and a continuous suture with absorbable skin closure material. Maximum care hospitals are characterized by shorter in-hospital stays and improved quality assurance.


KEY WORDS: Thyroid surgery; Surgical technique; Skin closure; Perioperative management; Perioperative standard

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