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Minerva Stomatologica 2019 June;68(3):132-41

DOI: 10.23736/S0026-4970.19.04166-9

Copyright © 2019 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Ectodermal and ectomesenchymal marker expression in primary cell lines of complex and compound odontomas: a pilot study

David A. TREJO-REMIGIO 1, Luis F. JACINTO-ALEMÁN 2, Elba R. LEYVA-HUERTA 3, Bogdan R. NAVARRO-BUSTOS 4, Javier PORTILLA-ROBERTSON 1

1 Department of Oral Medicine and Pathology, Graduate Dental School, National Autonomous Mexico University, Mexico City, Mexico; 2 Laboratory of Cell Culture and Immunohistochemistry, Department of Oral Medicine and Pathology, Graduate Dental School, National Autonomous Mexico University, Mexico City, Mexico; 3 Service of Oral Pathology Diagnosis, Department of Oral Medicine and Pathology, Graduate Dental School, National Autonomous Mexico University, Mexico City, Mexico; 4 Dental School, National Autonomous Mexico University, Mexico City, Mexico



BACKGROUND: Odontomas are odontogenic tumors with hamartoma features that are classified as compound or complex. Our objective was to characterize the proliferation of ectodermal and ectomesenchymal profile markers of primary cell cultures of complex and compound odontomas.
METHODS: Four samples of compound odontomas (OdCm) and three of complex odontomas (OdCx) were obtained from patients attending the Oral Pathology and Medicine Clinic of the Graduate Dental School, National Autonomous University of Mexico for primary culture generation. MTT, immunocytochemistry and RT-PCR assays of CD34, Sox2, Amel, Ambn, p21, EDAR, Msx1, Msx2, Pax9, RUNX2, BSP, OPN, Barx1 and GAPDH (control) were performed. Additionally, six paraffin-embedded odontomas were obtained for immunocytochemistry and RT-PCR validation assays. The mean and standard deviation were determined, and ANOVA and Kruskall-Wallis tests were performed.
RESULTS: Cultured compound odontoma exhibited higher proliferation, and an ectomesenchymal immunocytochemistry profile with predominant expression of Amel, BSP, Pax9, EDAR, Barx and Msx2; in complex cultured odontoma Sox2, CD34, RUNX2 and OPN predominated. Our statistical analysis showed a significant difference in PCR analysis (P<0.05) for OPN and CD34. Paraffin-embedded odontomas showed similar pattern with difference for NGFR and Sox2 for immunohistochemistry and EDAR, BARX1 and PAX9 for RT-PCR assays.
CONCLUSIONS: The results suggested heterogeneous behavior for both odontoma cell lines, because in compound odontomas predominant biomarkers are related to the enamel knot, late-stage odontogenesis and ectomesenchymal interactions; and in complex odontoma the significant expression of CD34 and OPN could be responsible for the difference behavior and mineralized amorphous structure.


KEY WORDS: Odontoma; Edar receptor; MSX2 protein; CD34 antigens

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