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Minerva Pediatrica 2021 Jan 13

DOI: 10.23736/S0026-4946.20.06177-0

Copyright © 2020 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Early diagnosis and post-operative follow-up of 50 Chinese children with craniopharyngioma

Xue MA 1, Fengxue WANG 2, Shule ZHANG 1, Guimei LI 1, 2

1 Department of Pediatrics, Shandong Provincial Hospital, Cheeloo College of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, China; 2 Department of Pediatrics, Shandong Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong First Medical University, Jinan, Shandong, China


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BACKGROUND: Craniopharyngioma is a relatively common congenital intracranial tumour for children. But only few available studies focused on the endocrine evaluation before diagnosis and post-operative endocrine evaluations of children with craniopharyngioma.
AIM: This study aims to aid in the early diagnosis of craniopharyngioma (CP) and follow-up post-operative children suffered from craniopharyngioma. Methods. Craniopharyngioma patients, as the CP group (n = 50), and healthy children, as the control group (n = 30), the symptoms and pituitary hormone levels were reviewed and investigated. RESULTS: The pre-operative levels of peak of GH, IGF-1, FT4, ACTH, COR and PRL of CP patients were significantly lower than those of the control group (all the P ≤ 0.001). Levels of pituitary-hormones after surgery were significantly lower than both those before surgery and those of the control group (all the P ≤ 0.001). HGH treatment could significantly improve the growth velocity of post-operative children (3.8 ± 1.5 cm/year vs 13.0 ± 3.4 cm/year for males, P ≤ 0.001; 4.0 ± 1.3 cm/year vs 12.7 ± 1.8 cm/year for females, P ≤ 0.001).
CONCLUSIONS: Children presenting with endocrine disturbance symptoms combined with pituitary hormone deficits should be assessed by MRI to exclude craniopharyngioma earlier. Also, long-term follow-up study was very essential to craniopharyngioma survivors.


KEY WORDS: Children with craniopharyngioma; Early diagnosis; Hormonal changes; Follow-up

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