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ORIGINAL ARTICLE   

Minerva Pediatrics 2021 February;73(1):50-8

DOI: 10.23736/S2724-5276.16.04419-4

Copyright © 2016 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Relationship between dietary diversity score and general health in female students

Azadeh AMINIANFAR 1, Fereydoun SIASSI 1, Mostafa QORBANI 2, Javad KARIMI 3, Gity SOTOUDEH 1 , Yas KALIKIAS 1, Sanaz SOLTANI 1

1 Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutritional Sciences and Dietetics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 2 Department of Social Medicine, School of Public Health, Medical University of Alborz, Karaj, Iran; 3 Department of Psychology, School of Literature and Humanities, University of Malayer, Hamadan, Iran



BACKGROUND: Adolescence is a critical period with respect to mental and psychological issues. The role of nutrients is well known in health condition in adolescents, but little emphasis is placed on total diet quality. Dietary diversity score (DDS) is often used to assess diet quality. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between DDS and general health in girl students.
METHODS: The present research is a cross-sectional study which used descriptive-analytical approach. A total of 384 high-school female students selected using proportional stratified sampling. Physical activity level, diet and general health information collected using International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), Dietary Diversity Questionnaire (FAO-2013) and 28-item self-reported general health questionnaire (GHQ-28), respectively. In addition, weight, height and waist circumference (WC) measured. Data analyzed using Chi-Square test, one-way ANOVA and Multinomial Logistic Regression.
RESULTS: Mean DDS was 4.43±1.09. After adjustment for confounders of age, body mass index, physical activity, socioeconomic status and nutritional supplement intake, students with higher DDS were less prone to general health disorders (P≤0.05).
CONCLUSIONS: These finding implicate higher DDS in adolescents may associate with better general health.


KEY WORDS: Diet; Recommended dietary allowances; Adolescent

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