Home > Journals > Minerva Pediatrics > Past Issues > Minerva Pediatrica 2017 February;69(1) > Minerva Pediatrica 2017 February;69(1):30-5

CURRENT ISSUE
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

Publishing options
eTOC
To subscribe
Submit an article
Recommend to your librarian
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Publication history
Reprints
Permissions
Cite this article as
Share

 

ORIGINAL ARTICLE   

Minerva Pediatrica 2017 February;69(1):30-5

DOI: 10.23736/S0026-4946.16.04210-9

Copyright © 2015 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Tuberculosis and tuberculin skin test reactivity in pediatric patients with celiac disease

Nafiye URGANCI 1, Derya KALYONCU 2, 3

1 Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Sisli Etfal Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey; 2 Department of Pediatrics, Sisli Etfal Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey; 3 Department of Pediatrics, İstinye State Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey


PDF


BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to determine tuberculin skin test reactivity and associated factors in pediatric patients with celiac disease (CD).
METHODS: Tuberculin skin test (TST) was performed on 28 patients with CD aged from 1 year to 15 years (mean, 6.64±4.8) and 28 healthy age and sex-matched children. The association between TST reactivity and parameters such as age, gender, malnutrition, clinical presentation, compliance to gluten free diet and response to hepatitis A and B vaccinations were determined.
RESULTS: No difference was observed in TST reactivity (induration size) between the patients with CD and healthy controls. Thirty-two percent (9/28) of the patients were anergic, and one-third of these nine patients had malnutrition. No significant difference was observed between TST-positive and TST-negative patients in terms of age, gender, malnutrition, compliance to gluten-free diet and response to hepatitis A and B vaccinations (P>0.05). One of 11 patients with positive TST had tuberculosis disease and 10 had latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI), whereas none of the controls had LTBI or tuberculosis disease (P=0.0007).
CONCLUSIONS: Although based on a small number of cases, it seems that children with CD are more susceptible to tuberculosis than healthy children. TST can be used to identify BCG-vaccinated children with CD who are probably infected with M. tuberculosis, similarly to healthy children.


KEY WORDS: Anergy - Celiac disease - Childhood - PPD - Tuberculin skin test

top of page