Home > Journals > Minerva Pediatrica > Past Issues > Articles online first > Minerva Pediatrica 2020 May 15

CURRENT ISSUE
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

eTOC
To subscribe
Submit an article
Recommend to your librarian
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Publication history
Reprints
Permissions
Cite this article as

 

 

Minerva Pediatrica 2020 May 15

DOI: 10.23736/S0026-4946.20.05755-2

Copyright © 2020 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Assessment of preferable site for temperature measurement using non contact infra-red temperature among pediatric patients

Saiprasad O. KAVTHEKAR 1, Ashok A. CHOUGULE 1 , Swati S. KAVTHEKAR 2, Anil B. KURANE 1, Sachin VERMA 1

1 Department of Pediatrics, Dr D. Y. Patil Hospital and Research Centre and D. Y. Patil Medical College, D.Y. Patil Education Society (Deemed-to-be-University), Kolhapur, Maharashtra, India; 2 Department of Pathology, Dr D. Y. Patil Hospital and Research Centre and D. Y. Patil Medical College, D.Y. Patil Education society (Deemed-to-be-University), Kolhapur, Maharashtra, India


PDF


BACKGROUND: Accurate temperature measurement with little or no discomfort that is safe, without risk of hospital-acquired infections or perforations, is the preferred choice of medical professionals in pediatric settings. The objective was to discover the preferable site for body temperature measurement using non-contact infra-red thermometer (NCIT) among pediatric patients.
METHODS: NCIT measurement at mid forehead (F), right temporal region (T), right side of neck- over-carotid artery area (N), jugular notch (J), sternum (S), umbilical region and sublingual region (U) were compared with digital axillary temperature (DAT) in a single attempt in 500 patients, aged between 2 to 5 years with fever. Data was analyzed using Pearson’s correlation, paired T-test and Bland-Altman plot to assess the correlation and agreement between the DAT and NCIT sites.
RESULTS: The mean temperature of NCIT-T (38.42 ± 0.64 °C) was more agreeable with DAT (38.42 ± 0.63 °C) compared to other body sites. The minimum mean bias of -0.00480 °C was noted for NCIT-F with 95% CI of -0.164-0.15; however, NCIT-F revealed many outliers as compared to NCIT-J. A strong positive correlation existed between DAT and NCIT sites (r value: 0.99-0.98). However, significant difference was found between DAT and NCIT-N, NCIT-F and NCIT-U (p value < 0.0001).
CONCLUSIONS: NCIT-J is the most preferable choice for measuring body temperature and can be interchanged with DAT. It will help to deliver fast results with enhanced patient comfort due to its non-invasive nature.


KEY WORDS: Body temperature; Children; Digital axillary temperature; Jugular notch; Non-contact Infra-red thermometer

top of page