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Minerva Pediatrica 2019 May 23

DOI: 10.23736/S0026-4946.19.05484-7

Copyright © 2019 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Factors associated with thyroid dysfunction in children with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes mellitus

Weixia YANG , Feifei SHENG

Department of Pediatrics, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong, Jiangsu Province, China


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BACKGROUND: This study aims to investigate the possible factors associated with thyroid dysfunction (TD) in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM).
METHODS: 87 children with T1DM were evaluated in terms of their clinical profile as well as tested for pancreatic and thyroid antibodies. Thyroid function were tested at baseline and 10 days after treatment onset.
RESULTS: Thyroid dysfunction was present in 13 (14.9%) patients after correction of acute metabolic disorders. The prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism (10.3%) was found to be higher than that of clinical hypothyroidism (3.4%) and clinical hyperthyroidism (1.2%). Both pancreatic and thyroid antibody were detected positive in TD patients, which was significantly different from that with euthyroidism (P<0.01, P<0.05). The frequency of TD family history was significantly higher in subjects with TD rather than with euthyroidism (P<0.01). The levels of free and total triiodothyronine, free and total thyroxine were in the hypothyroid range at the time of admission, all of which increased to normal range after 10 days of therapy in 32 DKA children (P=0.02 and P<0.01). There was a significant correlation between pH and free triiodothyronine levels (P<0.05).
CONCLUSIONS: TD is related to family factors, autoimmunity, and acute metabolic stress in the T1DM and regular thyroid screening should be performed.


KEY WORDS: Children - Diabetes mellitus - Thyroid dysfunction - Autoimmunity

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