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Minerva Pediatrica 2019 Jan 02

DOI: 10.23736/S0026-4946.18.05365-3

Copyright © 2018 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Human bocavirus in children with acute gastroenteritis in Piedmont, Italy

Massimiliano BERGALLO 1, 2 , Valentina DAPRÀ 1, Marco RASSU 2, Cristina CALVI 2, Paola MONTANARI 1, 2, Ilaria GALLIANO 1,2

1 Citoimmunodiagnostics Laboratory, Department of Public Health and Pediatric Sciences, Medical School, University of Turin, Turin, Italy; 2 Infectious Diseases Unit, Department of Pediatrics, Regina Margherita Children's Hospital, University of Turin, Turin, Italy


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BACKGROUND: Gastroenteritis is a common disease in children, characterized by diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and fever. Co-detection of HBoV with other gastroenteric viruses was reported a lot in patients with acute gastroenteritis.
METHODS: This paper presents the real-time RT-PCR Taqman assay for the detection and quantification of HBoV for clinical fecal samples collected from hospitalized children with acute gastroenteritis in Piedmont.
RESULTS: All fecal specimens were tested for the presence of HBoV with specific primers and probe. A total of 17 out of 123 (13.92%) episodes of acute gastroenteritis were associated with HBoV genomic detection with median viral load 6864.75±19784.79 genomes/mg fecal specimens. Among the 17 HBoV-positive cases, 11 were also positive for other viral pathogens, including rotavirus (n = 2), astrovirus (n=1), norovirus GII (n=6), norovirus GI (n=2) . Two cases were positive for more than one virus including norovirus GII and norovirus GI (n=1) and rotavirus, sapovirus and astrovirus (n=1). A higher detection of HBoV infections was observed in winter, and peaking in February.
CONCLUSIONS: Although HBoV is suspected to be responsible for gastroenteritis in children, our data showed that this association was uncertain since none difference was observed in term of viral load in the group with single infection of HBoV and group of coinfections with other viral agent.


KEY WORDS: DNA extraction - Epidemiology - Parvovirus

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