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Minerva Pediatrica 2018 Jul 18

DOI: 10.23736/S0026-4946.18.05219-2

Copyright © 2018 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Prevalence of human cosavirus and saffold virus in young children with gastroenteritis, Northern Italy

Valentina DAPRÀ 1, Paola MONTANARI 1, 2, Marco RASSU 2, Cristina CALVI 1, 2, Ilaria GALLIANO 1, 2, Massimiliano BERGALLO 1, 2

1 Department of Public Health and Pediatric Sciences, Citoimmunodiagnostics Laboratory, University of Turin, Medical School, Turin, Italy; 2 Department of Pediatrics, Infectious Diseases Unit, Regina Margherita Children's Hospital, University of Turin, Turin, Italy


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BACKGROUND: Gastroenteritis is a common disease in children, characterized by diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and fever. Human Cosavirus (HCoSV) and Saffold virus (SAFV) both have a worldwide distribution. Both viruses have been detected in the stools of patients with acute gastroenteritis in several countries.
METHODS: In order to provide more insights into the epidemiology of enteric viruses that are not included usually in routine diagnostic tests, cases of childhood sporadic gastroenteritis of unknown etiology requiring hospital admission in Turin, Italy, during December 2014 to November 2015, were screened for HCoSV and SAFV.
RESULTS: A total of 1 out of 164 (0.6%) episodes of acute gastroenteritis were associated with SAFV genomic detection. Among the 1 SAFV-positive cases, 1 were also positive for adenovirus. The patient positive for SAFV don’t present diarrheal episodes but vomiting. HCoSV was not detected in any of the samples.
CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, this study presents the current epidemiological data regarding the two viruses, HCoSV and SAFV, circulating in pediatric patients admitted to hospital with acute gastroenteritis in Turin, Italy.


KEY WORDS: RNA extraction - Epidemiology - Picornavirus

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