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Minerva Pediatrica 2020 June;72(3):175-81

DOI: 10.23736/S0026-4946.16.04273-0

Copyright © 2015 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Iron parameters, pro-hepcidin and soluble transferrin receptor levels in obese children

Güzide DOĞAN 1, Nesibe ANDIRAN 2, Nurullah ÇELİK 3 , Sema UYSAL 4

1 Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Fatih University, Ankara, Turkey; 2 Department of Pediatric Endocrinology, Faculty of Medicine, Yıldırım Beyazıt University, Keçiören Training and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey; 3 Department of Pediatric Endocrinology, Faculty of Medicine, Fatih University, Ankara, Turkey; 4 Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Fatih University, Ankara, Turkey


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BACKGROUND: Iron deficiency is common in obese children although the underlying mechanism is unclear. Several studies have investigated the relation between iron deficiency and obesity, but studies focusing on children are rare. The aim of this paper is to investigate the associations between iron parameters, pro-hepcidin and soluble transferrin receptor levels in obese children.
METHODS: A total of 110 children aged from 6 to 16, 50 with primary obesity and 60 healthy children and adolescents, were enrolled. Complete blood count, serum iron levels, iron binding capacity, ferritin levels, soluble transferrin receptor, and pro-hepcidin levels were studied.
RESULTS: Serum iron and transferrin saturation index levels were significantly low, red cell distribution width and ferritin levels were significantly high in obese children compared to control group. No association between soluble transferrin receptor, pro-hepcidin and iron parameters was detected. A positive correlation between ferritin and pro-hepcidin levels was defined.
CONCLUSIONS: Obese children and adolescents were at greater risk for iron deficiency. It should be considered in the diet recommendations.


KEY WORDS: Obesity; Child; Iron-deficiency anemia; Transferrin receptors; Hepcidins; Adolescent

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