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  HIP UPDATE 2013 

Minerva Ortopedica e Traumatologica 2013 February;64(1):1-13

Copyright © 2013 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Update on hip instability

Skendzel J. G., Goljan P., Philippon M. J.

The Steadman Philippon Research Institute, Vail, USA


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The understanding of hip instability has advanced recently due to a renewed interest in the causes of hip pain in young, active individuals. Hip instability is increasingly recognized as a potential source of pain and disability in active individuals. Broadly, hip instability is classified as either traumatic or atraumatic in origin. The diagnosis depends on a thorough patient history and physical examination, including radiographic evaluation of the affected hip. Specific physical exam tests can confirm the presence of hip instability if suspected by the clinician. Treatment options include non-surgical management such as physical therapy, activity modification, and protected weight bearing. Surgical options include both open and arthroscopic approaches to manage soft tissue laxity or bony deficiency once the instability has been refractory to other treatments. In order to formulate a thoughtful and effective treatment plan, the clinician must have a comprehensive understanding of all potential causes of hip pathology.

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