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Minerva Ortopedica e Traumatologica 2020 September;71(3):128-31

DOI: 10.23736/S0394-3410.20.03964-8

Copyright © 2020 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Teenagers’ sub-acute acetabular dysplasia

Alessandro APRATO 1 , Riccardo SACCO 1, Silvio BOERO 2, Giorgio MARRÈ 2, Antonio ANDREACCHIO 3, Alessandro MASSÈ 1

1 Department of Orthopedic and Traumatology, Orthopedic and Trauma Center, Turin, Italy; 2 Unit of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Department of Surgery, Giannina Gaslini Institute, Genoa, Italy; 3 Department of Pediatric Orthopedics, Regina Margherita Children’s Hospital, Turin, Italy



Flattening of acetabular roof in skeletally immature patients has been demonstrated in chronic acetabular rim overload but even short-term triggers may transform healthy hip in a dysplastic one around triradiate cartilage closure time frame. We collected three possible causes of acetabular flattening after a short-term overload in patients at the end of their potential growth of the acetabulum: congenital femoral deficiency treated with surgical lengthening, slipped capital femoral epiphysis treated with anatomical reorientations and intra-articular disease. Excessive pressure on the acetabulum for timeframe shorter than one year may lead to acetabular roof flattening in patients between 12 and 14 years old.


KEY WORDS: Bone lengthening; Hip; Chondromatosis; Slipped capital femoral epiphysis

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