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  PROCEEDING OF THE III CONGRESS OF THE ITALIAN STUDY GROUP ON LOW VISION (GISI) (Rome, December 7, 1995) 

Minerva Oftalmologica 1999 September;41(3):109-14

Copyright © 1999 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: Italian

Neurosynaptic plasticity and optic biostimulation

Limoli P. G., D’Amato L., Giulotto A., Franzetti M., Carella A.


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A low vision patient develops an anomalous relationship between the well functioning retina and the cortical elaboration of the perceived retinal signal. However, after 2 or 3 months visual rehabilitation, some renewal of visual ability might of ten be noted. According to the neurosynaptic plasticity theory, in a third of the cases and within certain limits, it would be possible to favour a re-connection between the retina well functioning areas contiguos to the lesions and the cortical areas devoted to the vision of details. This re-connection process is obtained through optic neurostimulation, meaning any action able to determine, in a low vision patient, an efficient electrofunctional action on the structure which is devoted to reception, transmission and perception of the visual stimuli. Neurostimulation increases the metabolic-energetic requirements of the above mentioned nervous structure because it is necessary to re-create previously non existing intercellular neurosynaptic connections. When biologically active substances are used to influence the cellular membrane neurosynaptic and the membrane electrical potentials, the term optical biostimulation can be used.

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