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Minerva Obstetrics and Gynecology 2022 August;74(4):377-85

DOI: 10.23736/S2724-606X.22.04996-X

Copyright © 2022 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Why might ovarian rejuvenation fail? Decision analysis of variables impacting reproductive response after autologous platelet-rich plasma

E. Scott SILLS 1, 2

1 Section of Plasma Research, FertiGen CAG/Regenerative Biology Group, San Clemente, CA, USA; 2 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Palomar Medical Center, Escondido, CA, USA



Experience with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has accumulated from use in dental restoration, postinfarct myocardial repair, tendon surgery, pain management, and aesthetic enhancements. Reproductive medicine joined this arena in 2016, beginning with reports of menopause reversal and fertility recovery after autologous PRP for senescent ovaries. Although recent publications have highlighted benefits of “ovarian rejuvenation,” the absence of randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial data has limited its acceptance. Because selection bias tends to underreport negative outcomes, reliable estimates cannot be calculated for how often intraovarian PRP is unsuccessful. However, ample information is available to permit an operational root-cause analysis when failures are considered. This assessment uses a PRP treatment care path with a decision theory model to critique pre-intake screening, baseline audit, sample processing, ovarian tissue placement method, equipment selection, and follow-up monitoring. These branched choice points enable interventions likely to determine outcome. Specimen handling for intraovarian PRP merits particular scrutiny, since enormous variation in platelet protocols already exists across unrelated clinical areas. As a new addition to fertility practice, intraovarian PRP requires validation of safety and efficacy to gain wider support. Borrowing PRP knowledge from other domains can facilitate this goal, ideally with appreciation of aspects unique to intraovarian use.


KEY WORDS: Decision theory; Infertility; Menopause

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