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REVIEW  ENDOMETRIOSIS: CURRENT KNOWLEDGE FROM LAB TO CLINIC 

Minerva Obstetrics and Gynecology 2021 June;73(3):341-6

DOI: 10.23736/S2724-606X.21.04705-5

Copyright © 2021 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Deep endometriosis: medical or surgical treatment?

Fernanda ARCOVERDE 1, Marina P. ANDRES 2, 3, Carolina C. SOUZA 3, Joao S. NETO 2, 3, Mauricio S. ABRÃO 2, 3

1 Unit of Gynecology, Natus Lumine Maternidade, São Luís do Maranhão, Brazil; 2 Section of Endometriosis, Division of Gynecology, Hospital das Clinicas HCFMUSP, Faculty of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil; 3 Division of Gynecologic, BP - A Beneficencia Portuguesa de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil



Deep endometriosis (DE) is classically defined as disease that infiltrates structures by more than 5 mm, such as bowel, ureters, bladder and vagina. The two major symptoms related to DE are pain and infertility. A lot of debate goes on upon the best treatment choice for DE. Treatments include medical therapy with oral progestins or combined contraceptives, and surgery for resection of DE nodules. In this review we focus on the best option treatment for the symptomatic patients with DE not seeking conception. We performed a narrative review of literature searching for the latest evidence on efficacy and outcomes of medical and surgical treatment of DE patients. Results showed that 2/3 of patients with DE will be satisfied with hormonal treatment, and surgery will be effective in improving QoL in most patients with DE. Most studies published regarding surgical outcomes involve bowel endometriosis, and their complication rates should not be extrapolated to all DE. DE that does not infiltrate pelvic viscera accounts for most cases of DE. Together with DE affecting the urinary tract, a much lower rate of severe complications is reported when compared to bowel endometriosis. This distinction should influence decision making. Medical treatment should be first option for non-complicated DE patients not seeking conception. Surgery should be indicated for those who do not tolerate nor improve with medical treatment, as well as those cases complicated by visceral impairment.


KEY WORDS: Endometriosis; Pain; Surgery

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