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Minerva Ginecologica 2020 June;72(3):165-70

DOI: 10.23736/S0026-4784.20.04477-9

Copyright © 2020 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

The current status of sacrocolpopexy in the management of apical prolapse

Chunbo LI, Keqin HUA

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, China



Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is a prevalent condition that negatively affects women’ s quality of life. There is growing recognition that adequate support for the vaginal apex is an important component of a durable surgical repair for women with advanced prolapse, including the anterior and posterior wall prolapse. Surgical treatment options include abdominal and vaginal approaches, the former of which can be performed open, laparoscopically, and robotically. Sacrocolpopexy is a common procedure designed for the treatment of prolapse including uterine or vaginal vault prolapse and multiple-compartment prolapse. Although traditionally performed as an open abdominal procedure, minimally invasive sacrocolpopexy, whether laparoscopic or robotic, has been successfully performed in the clinical practice by many pelvic reconstructive surgeons. In order to require an outstanding cosmetic result, transumbilical/transvaginal single-port sacrocolpopexy has been developed to achieve the goal and initial outcomes have demonstrated their efficacy, safety and feasibility. However, up to date, there are many variations to these procedures, with different levels of evidence to support each of them. Herein we reviewed the current literatures on current surgical choices for women with apical prolapse.


KEY WORDS: Pelvic organ prolapse; Minimally Invasive surgical procedures; Surgery

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