Home > Journals > Minerva Ginecologica > Past Issues > Minerva Ginecologica 2017 April;69(2) > Minerva Ginecologica 2017 April;69(2):195-205

CURRENT ISSUE
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

eTOC
To subscribe
Submit an article
Recommend to your librarian
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Publication history
Reprints
Permissions
Cite this article as

 

REVIEW   

Minerva Ginecologica 2017 April;69(2):195-205

DOI: 10.23736/S0026-4784.16.03911-3

Copyright © 2016 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: Italian

Pregnancy after bariatric surgery

Franco PEPE 1, Francesco DE LUCA 2, Mariagrazia STRACQUADANIO 3, Claudia GARRAFFO 3, Veronica C. SANTONOCITO 3, Agata PRIVITERA 2

1 UOC Ostetricia e Ginecologia con Pronto Soccorso, Ospedale Santo Bambino, Catania, Italy; 2 UOC Cardiologia Pediatrica, Ospedale Santo Bambino, Catania, Italy; 3 Istituto di Patologia Ostetrica e Ginecologica, Ospedale Santo Bambino, Catania, Italy


PDF


Pregnancy after bariatric surgery has some peculiarities related to obesity, type of surgery, amount of weight loss, time elapsed from the surgery and adherence to medical prescriptions. Pregnant woman is at risk of nutritional deficiencies and it is unclear whether there is an increased incidence of intestinal complications during pregnancy after bariatric surgery and whether this kind of complications are more frequent during cesarean section. The fetus is at high risk of prematurity and fetal growth restriction, but they seem not at increased risk of birth defects (DTN) except in individual cases of folic acid deficiency (DTN) or vitamin K defect (similar abnormalities in patients receiving oral anticoagulants). In addition, the incidence of gestational diabetes and hypertension results to be decreased. Other postnatal outcomes from possible epigenetic modifications need to be evaluated in the long-term postnatal follow-up.


KEY WORDS: Obesity - Pregnancy - Bariatric surgery - Diet - Fetal growth retardation

top of page