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Minerva Endocrinology 2021 March;46(1):107-15

DOI: 10.23736/S2724-6507.20.03154-5

Copyright © 2020 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Erythroid microRNA and oxidant status alterations in l-thyroxine-induced hyperthyroid rats: effects of selenium supplementation

Nurten BAHTIYAR 1 , Aysun YOLDAS 1, Yavuz ABBAK 1, Nuran DARIYERLI 2, Selmin TOPLAN 1

1 Department of Biophysics, University Hospital of Cerrahpasa, Istanbul, Turkey; 2 Department of Physiology, University Hospital of Cerrahpasa, Istanbul, Turkey



BACKGROUND: Hypermetabolic state in hyperthyroidism causes oxidative stress. Erythrocytes are the cells that are involved in oxidant equilibrium in an organism and contain microRNA (miRNA). Selenium, which is an essential element for an organism, has antioxidant properties. The present study was aimed at investigating the effects of selenium supplementation in hyperthyroidism, on pro- and antioxidant enzymes, and miRNA (miR-144 and miR-451) expressions in the erythrocytes.
METHODS: Forty-eight Sprague-Dawley male rats were divided into 6 groups; control group, group fed with 0.5 mg/kg sodium selenite; group fed with 1 mg/kg sodium selenite; hyperthyroid group; hyperthyroid group fed with 0.5 mg/kg sodium selenite; and hyperthyroid group fed with 1 mg/kg sodium selenite. Malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione (GSH), miR-144, and miR-451 expression levels were studied in erythrocyte hemolysates.
RESULTS: MDA levels were increased in the hyperthyroid group compared to the control group, and the group fed with 0.5 mg/kg sodium selenite (P<0.001 and P<0.01, respectively). GSH levels were increased in the hyperthyroid group and the hyperthyroid group fed with 0.5 mg/kg sodium selenite compared to the control group (P<0.001, and P<0.05, respectively). GSH levels of the hyperthyroid group fed with 1 mg/kg sodium selenite were decreased when compared with the hyperthyroid group (P<0.05). SOD levels of the hyperthyroid group were increased when compared with the control group (P<0.05, and P<0.001, respectively). Similarly, SOD levels of the hyperthyroid group fed with 1 mg/kg sodium selenite were lower than the hyperthyroid group (P<0.01). miR-144 values were increased in the hyperthyroid group and the hyperthyroid group fed with 0.5 mg/kg sodium selenite compared to the control group (P<0.001, and P<0.05 respectively). miR-451 expression was increased significantly in the hyperthyroid group compared to the control group (P<0.05).
CONCLUSIONS: Our findings showed that MDA, SOD and GSH levels increased, and miR-144 and miR-451 expressions changed in hyperthyroidism. Supplementation of 1 mg/kg sodium selenite was more effective than 0.5 mg/kg sodium selenite for normalizing the MDA, GSH, SOD, and miRNA levels in the hyperthyroid group.


KEY WORDS: Hyperthyroidism; Oxidants; Erythrocytes; Selenium; MicroRNAs

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