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Minerva Chirurgica 2020 April;75(2):104-10

DOI: 10.23736/S0026-4733.20.08226-7

Copyright © 2020 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Quality of recovery after major emergency abdominal surgery: a prospective observational cohort study

Jakob O. ORESKOV 1 , Jakob BURCHARTH 1, Andreas F. NIELSEN 1, Sarah EKELOEF 1, Jakob KLEIF 2, Ismail GÖGENUR 1

1 Department of Surgery, Center for Surgical Science, Zealand University Hospital, Koege, Denmark; 2 Department of Surgery, North Zealand Hospital, Hilleroed, Denmark



BACKGROUND: Major emergency abdominal surgery results in high morbidity and mortality. We aimed to describe patient-reported quality of recovery after major emergency abdominal surgery.
METHODS: A prospective observational cohort study of patients undergoing major emergency abdominal surgery at a University Hospital was conducted in the period between November 2016 and February 2017. Patients were interviewed using the 15-item questionnaire Quality of Recovery (QoR-15) six times over the first 30 postoperative days. Patients’ maximum score of QoR-15 ranging from 0-150 were divided into four groups depending on recovery status going from poor (score of 0-89), moderate (score of 90-121), good (score of 122-135) to excellent (score of 136-150) recovery.
RESULTS: A total of 37 patients were included in the trial. At postoperative day (POD) 1 the recovery status of the patients was mainly poor to moderate (poor N.=8 [22%], moderate N.=23 [62%], good N.=4 [11%] and excellent N.=2 [5%]). Sixteen (55%) of the patients reported a poor or moderate recovery within the first 7 days after surgery, which advanced to good or excellent recovery (N.=19 [68%]) from POD 14. The patients were not fully recovered at POD 30 (N.=18 [62%] had an excellent recovery).
CONCLUSIONS: Recovery measured by QoR-15 is substantially affected after major emergency abdominal surgery even after 14- and 30 days postoperatively. The patients were poor or only moderately recovered within the first seven postoperative days and only 62% of the patients were fully recovered at postoperative day 30.


KEY WORDS: General surgery; Patient reported outcome measures; Convalescence; Anesthesia recovery period; Psychometrics; Patient satisfaction

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