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REVIEW  TAVI: NEW PERSPECTIVES 

Minerva Cardioangiologica 2019 February;67(1):19-38

DOI: 10.23736/S0026-4725.18.04783-7

Copyright © 2018 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Transcatheter aortic valve replacement in low risk patients

Lucia JUNQUERA, Alfredo FERREIRA-NETO, Leonardo GUIMARAES, Lluis ASMARATS, David DEL VAL, Jerome WINTZER-WEHEKIND, Guillem MUNTANÉ-CAROL, Afonso FREITAS-FERRAZ, Josep RODÉS-CABAU

Quebec Heart and Lung Institute, Laval University, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada



Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a relatively new technology that has grown exponentially over the past decade. Although it was initially restricted to elderly patients at very high or prohibitive surgical risk, it is currently being evaluated as a treatment option in younger and lower risk patients. The increasing experience of the Heart Teams, along with the continued refinement of transcatheter valve technology has resulted in TAVR achieving results comparable to those of surgery for treating intermediate-risk patients. Furthermore, promising preliminary results have been obtained from observational and propensity matched studies in low risk patients, and a small randomized trial showed the non-inferiority of TAVR vs. SAVR regarding early and late (up to 6 years) outcomes. Three ongoing randomized trials will provide the definite response about the safety and efficacy of TAVR for treating low risk patients with severe aortic stenosis in the near future. The (expected) positive results of these studies would establish the basis for TAVR as the preferred treatment for the majority of patients with aortic stenosis. However, continuous research efforts for better determining valve durability among TAVR recipients, as well as reducing some of the genuine and frequent complications of TAVR (e.g. conduction disturbances) are important in this final effort for making TAVR the default treatment for aortic stenosis.


KEY WORDS: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement - Aortic valve stenosis - Prognosis

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