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REVIEW  STEMI: CURRENT KNOWLEDGE AND FUTURE PERSPECTIVES 

Minerva Cardioangiologica 2018 August;66(4):452-63

DOI: 10.23736/S0026-4725.18.04680-7

Copyright © 2018 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Reperfusion in STEMI patients: still a role for cardioprotection?

Filippo OTTANI 1, 2 , Ugo LIMBRUNO 3, Roberto LATINI 4, Leonardo MISURACA 3, Marcello GALVANI 1, 2

1 Unit of Cardiology, Morgagni Hospital, Azienda USL della Romagna, Forlì, Italy; 2 Cardiologic Foundation “M. Z. Sacco”, Forlì, Italy; 3 Unit of Cardiology, Azienda USL Toscana Sudest, Grosseto, Italy; 4 IRCCS Istituto Ricerche Farmacologiche “Mario Negri”, Milan, Italy


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Ischemic heart disease remains a leading cause of death worldwide, responsible for an estimated 17.5 million deaths in 2012. Mortality from ST-elevation myocardial infarction STEMI have decreased over the last 3 decades. However, despite the success of reperfusion therapy by primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) or thrombolysis, STEMI is still of significant concern. A recent patient-level meta-analysis emphasized the pivotal importance of infarct size within 1 month after PPCI as a determinant of all-cause mortality and hospitalization for heart failure at 1 year. Although timely and complete reperfusion is the most effective way of limiting infarct size (IS) and subsequent ventricular remodeling, reperfusion per se adds an additional component of irreversible injury to the myocardium (known as ischemia/reperfusion injury, IRI), and the coronary circulation and it contributes to final infarct size. The prevention and treatment of lethal IRI and coronary microvascular dysfunction pose a continued and formidable barrier to successful myocardial perfusion as opposed to establishing patency of the epicardial infarct-related artery (IRA), and in this context the need for additional cardioprotective strategies to reduce IS and coronary microvascular dysfunction remains the ‘last frontier’ of reperfusion therapy.


KEY WORDS: Myocardial ischemia - ST elevation myocardial infarction - Reperfusion

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