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REVIEW  BIOTECHNOLOGICAL AND PHARMACOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS IN THE MODIFICATION OF CHRONIC INFLAMMATION-INDUCED DISEASES 

Minerva Biotechnology and Biomolecular Research 2021 June;33(2):76-85

DOI: 10.23736/S2724-542X.21.02759-2

Copyright © 2021 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Immunomodulatory role of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii in obesity and metabolic disorders

Yousefi BAHMAN 1, Mohammadlou MARYAM 1, Bahar AISA 2, Tetyana FALALYEYEVA 3, Nazarii KOBYLIAK 4, 5, Eslami MAJID 6, 7

1 Department of Immunology, Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Semnan, Iran; 2 Department of Biochemistry, Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Semnan, Iran; 3 Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Kyiv, Ukraine; 4 Department of Endocrinology, Bogomolets National Medical University, Kyiv, Ukraine; 5 Laboratory of Pathology CSD Health Care, Kyiv, Ukraine; 6 Cancer Research Center, Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Semnan, Iran; 7 Department of Bacteriology and Virology, Semnan University of Medical Sciences, Semnan, Iran



The gut microbiota is part of a complex network that interacts with the host metabolism and plays a key role in the immune system and regulation of hormone secretion. Any change in the gut microbiota (dysbiosis) is associated with various diseases such as metabolic syndromes. Dysbiosis can play a determining role in the pathogenesis of obesity-related metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Microbiota is effective in the progression of type 1 diabetes (T1D) by affecting the permeability and status of the intestinal immune system. In healthy conditions, the intestinal epithelium prevents the induction of immune system responses, but in T1D it is stimulated by microbial or dietary antigens following an increase in the permeability of the intestinal immune system. The key link between dysbiosis and type 2 diabetes (T2D) is intestinal epithelial cell dysfunction. By increasing epithelial permeability and causing mild inflammation, it leads to dysfunction of the immune system and changes in glucose and lipid metabolism by affecting signaling pathways. Faecalibacterium (F) prausnitzii is the most abundant bacterium in the human gut microbiota that is actively involved in host metabolism. F. prausnitzii can inhibit the activity of NF-κB, IL-8, and can modulate the intestinal immune system, oxidative stress, and colon cell metabolism by producing butyrate. F. prausnitzii has anti-inflammatory properties by producing MAM protein and salicylic acid, which is effective in reducing colitis. Decreased levels of bacteria in the gut are also linked to inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, obesity, and diabetes.


KEY WORDS: Faecalibacterium prausnitzii; Microbiota; Dysbiosis; Obesity; Metabolic syndrome

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