Home > Journals > Minerva Anestesiologica > Past Issues > Articles online first > Minerva Anestesiologica 2021 May 03

CURRENT ISSUE
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

eTOC
To subscribe
Submit an article
Recommend to your librarian
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Publication history
Reprints
Permissions
Cite this article as
Share

 

 

Minerva Anestesiologica 2021 May 03

DOI: 10.23736/S0375-9393.21.15388-X

Copyright © 2021 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Anaesthesia for the elderly: a narrative review

Cynthia OLOTU 1, 2

1 Geriatric Anaesthesiology Research Group, Department of Anaesthesiology, Centre of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Medical Centre Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany; 2 Commission of Geriatric Anaesthesiology, German Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine


PDF


As octogenarians in the operation room are no longer an exemption but the norm, perioperative management needs to be adopted to meet the special requirements of this group of patients. Anaesthesia does not need to be re-invented to fit the elderly. However, as elderly patients are among those most affected by adverse postoperative outcomes, the same diligence that is as a matter of course exercised in anaesthesiologic care of the youngest patients needs to be exercised for the eldest as well. Aging is associated with characteristic physiologic changes and an overall reduction in compensation width. However, the individual relevance of these changes varies distinctly. A comprehensive preoperative assessment is therefore essential to identify those at high risk. Maintaining functionality and preventing cognitive decline are central elements of perioperative care for frail elders, often only requiring unspectacular, but effective adjustments to established routine care processes. This review focuses on current recommendations in the perioperative anaesthesiologic management of elderly patients with a view towards assisting clinical anaesthesiologists in implementing respective structures in their setting and adjusting care pathways to meet the needs of this vulnerable but growing group of patients and improve their postoperative outcome.


KEY WORDS: Elderly, frail; Perioperative care; Anesthesia; Assessment; Risk; Surgery; Patient relevant outcome

top of page