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Minerva Anestesiologica 2020 June;86(6):601-7

DOI: 10.23736/S0375-9393.20.14173-7

Copyright © 2020 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Electroencephalographic density spectral array monitoring during propofol sedation in teenagers, using the narcotrend electroencephalographic monitor

Iris J. de HEER 1 , Annejet T. WARMENHOVEN 1, 2, Frank WEBER 1

1 Department of Anesthesiology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Sophia Children’s Hospital, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; 2 Department of Pediatrics, Alrijne Hospital, Leiderdorp, the Netherlands



BACKGROUND: Recently published articles address concerns about the safe use of currently available index-based depth of hypnosis monitors. Electroencephalographic Density Spectral Array monitoring facilitates the interpretation of unprocessed electroencephalogram data, providing the anesthesiologist with real-time drug-specific information on hypnotic depth. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the clinical applicability of Density Spectral Array with a commercially available monitor as the Narcotrend EEG monitor in teenagers under procedural sedation using propofol.
METHODS: We performed a secondary analysis of EEG data. Unprocessed electroencephalogram data from 37 patients, aged 12-18 years, scheduled for gastrointestinal endoscopy under propofol sedation, were used for analysis. The relationship between non-steady state propofol concentrations and Density Spectral Array, represented by the four electroencephalographic frequency bands β, α, θ and δ was investigated.
RESULTS: Increasing propofol concentration caused augmentation in the amplitude of frontal δ oscillations and a decrease in the amplitude of frontal β oscillations. The expression of α oscillations showed a biphasic pattern related to increasing the propofol concentration. Spearman correlation analysis showed a significant correlation between propofol concentration and relative EEG power in β (r -0.84, P<0.0001), θ (r 0.50, P=0.004) and δ (r 0.63, P<0.0001).
CONCLUSIONS: We were able to show that DSA displayed in real time, on a commercially available DoA monitor (the Narcotrend EEG monitor), can provide the anesthesiologist with understandable information regarding the dose-dependent EEG effects of propofol in teenagers.


KEY WORDS: Anesthesia; Electroencephalography; Pediatrics; Anesthesiologist

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