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Minerva Anestesiologica 2000 May;66(5):268-72

Copyright © 2009 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Why should I change my practice of anesthesia? Opioids

Camu F.

From the Department of Anesthesiology Flemish Free University of Brussels Medical Center Brussels, Belgium


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The selec­tion of opi­oid ­drugs for anes­the­sia is ­often ­based on empir­i­cal judg­ment ­such as the selec­tion of opi­oids ­with rap­id elim­i­na­tion ­half-­life for ­short sur­gi­cal pro­ce­dures (e.g. alfen­ta­nil), ­while opi­oids ­with long­er elim­i­na­tion ­half-­life (e.g. fen­ta­nyl, sufen­ta­nil) are ­used for long­er pro­ce­dures. A bet­ter ­insight in the phar­ma­cok­i­net­ic and phar­ma­cod­y­nam­ic dif­fer­enc­es ­between opi­oids ­allows a ­more ration­al selec­tion of the ­drug and its dos­ing ­scheme, and ­will con­trib­ute to rap­id recov­ery ­after anes­the­sia. As opi­oids are ­adjuncts to oth­er anes­thet­ic ­drugs, ­drug inter­ac­tion prin­ci­ples ­should be con­sid­ered ­when titrat­ing the opi­oid admin­is­tra­tion.

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