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PHYSIOLOGICAL AREA   

Medicina dello Sport 2022 June;75(2):206-17

DOI: 10.23736/S0025-7826.22.04148-5

Copyright © 2022 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English, Italian

Effects of static and PNF stretching on joint position sense and range of motion after a fatigue protocol in professional male soccer players

Behnam FARSHIDI 1, Abdolhamid DANESHJOO 1 , Mansour SAHEBOZAMANI 1, Andreas KONRAD 2

1 Department of Sports Injuries and Corrective Exercises, Faculty of Sports Sciences, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman, Iran; 2 Institute of Human Movement Science, Sport and Health, University of Graz, Graz, Austria


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BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of a single bout of static stretching (SS) or proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching of the knee flexors on joint position sense (JPS) and knee extension range of motion (ROM) after a soccer-specific fatigue protocol in young male professional soccer players.
METHODS: Forty-five male soccer players were randomly assigned into three groups: SS, PNF, and control groups (with 15 players in each group). All participants were measured at baseline, 15 min, and 24 h after Bangsbo’s fatigue protocol. Participants in the SS and PNF groups performed bilateral stretching of the hamstrings for 2.5 min each side, while the control group had a 5-min rest. The JPS and ROM were measured using digital photography and a goniometer, respectively.
RESULTS: A significantly lower JPS error was detected in the PNF group compared with the control group, at both time points (15 min [d=1.19] and 24 hours (d=1.57)). ROM increased in the control, SS, and PNF groups by 2.4%, 2.7%, and 3.4% (P<0.001), respectively, 15 min (but not 24 hours) after the intervention.
CONCLUSIONS: Performing PNF stretching could be a useful way to recover proprioception after muscle fatigue. Hence, to counteract injuries (i.e., JPS error), coaches and therapists should emphasize the use of the PNF stretching technique, rather than SS.


KEY WORDS: Proprioception; Muscle stretching exercises; Muscle fatigue

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