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Medicina dello Sport 2021 September;74(3):458-69

DOI: 10.23736/S0025-7826.21.03940-5

Copyright © 2021 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English, Italian

Does the occurrence of medial tibial stress syndrome depend on the running surface? An observational study

Katarzyna OGRODZKA-CIECHANOWICZ 1 , Katarzyna SZUMAL 1, Tomasz RIDAN 2

1 Faculty of Motor Rehabilitation, Institute of Clinical Rehabilitation, University of Physical Education in Krakow, Krakow, Poland; 2 Faculty of Motor Rehabilitation, Institute of Applied Sciences, University of Physical Education in Krakow, Krakow, Poland


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BACKGROUND: Currently, many runners choose different forms of running, depending on where they live, their own preferences or health condition. So, can the choice of running surface affect the development of MTSS? Furthermore, could the running surface be a risk factor for the development of MTSS? Up to date, to the best of our knowledge, there is a lack of reliable research comparing the occurrence of MTSS in people training on different surfaces. The aim of the study was to compare the occurrence of medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) in runners training overground, on a treadmill and on an elliptical cross trainer.
METHODS: One-hundred and fifty runners, divided into 3 groups depending on the type of running activity prevailing in their daily training participated in an observational study. Each group consisted of 50 people. The subjects were assigned to three groups: overground running, treadmill and elliptical cross trainer. The allocation for each group was based on the respondents’ declarations about the type of training. The subjective quantitative method in the form of an anonymous survey was used.
RESULTS: Seventy-nine of the respondents suffered from MTSS. MTSS symptoms were found in 28 among those running overground, 27 among those running on a treadmill, and 24 in those exercising on an elliptical cross trainer. The significant impact of foot defects on the development of MTSS was confirmed.
CONCLUSIONS: MTSS occurred in more than half of the respondents. The least number of people suffering from MTSS are those who train on an elliptical cross trainer and the largest on a treadmill. Foot defects significantly affected the development of MTSS. The choice of running surface is not a factor in the development of MTSS.


KEY WORDS: Medial tibial stress syndrome; Running; Risk factors

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