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Medicina dello Sport 2018 December;71(4):658-66

DOI: 10.23736/S0025-7826.18.03406-3

Copyright © 2018 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English, Italian

Study of knowledge, attitude, and consumption in Italian students towards the intake of performance-enhancing substances and energy-food supplements

Pamela BARBADORO, Elisa PONZIO , Anna MARIGLIANO, Daniela VINCITORIO, Elena DI TONDO, Valerio M. SCANDALI, Emilia PROSPERO, Francesco DI STANISLAO, Marcello M. D'ERRICO

Department of Biomedical Sciences and Public Health, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy


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BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors in high school students analyzing habits and level of knowledge regarding the intake of substances that help enhance sports performance.
METHODS: The study was conducted at 27 public secondary schools of Marche. The survey was conducted in the form of a self-administered questionnaire (a modified version of Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Questionnaire).
RESULTS: The total sample consisted of 755 high school students with an average age of 17.91±0.04 years, 422 males (55.89%) and 333 females (44.11%). Ninety students (11.92%) indicated use creatine and branched-chain amino acids, with prevalence in male (87.44%). Twenty-four male students (3.18%) out of 755 surveyed adolescents indicated the use of doping substances: 8 (1.06%) anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) and 16 (2.12%) stimulants. Among the 755 students surveyed, 662 (87,68%) had poor knowledge about doping. Multivariate model has confirmed the association between poor knowledge about doping
and attendance at technical institutes (OR 0.48; 95% CI: 0.28-084; P<0.05) and use of creatine/BCAAs (OR 0.23; 95% CI: 0.07-0.75; P<0.05).
CONCLUSIONS: High school students are poorly educated and do not receive enough information by those who have authority to do so as coaches and family doctors. Well-designed educational interventions are necessary.


KEY WORDS: Students - Performance-enhancing substances - Doping in sports - Health - Dietary supplements - Education

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