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Medicina dello Sport 2017 December;70(4):410-8

DOI: 10.23736/S0025-7826.17.03132-5

Copyright © 2017 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English, Italian

Effects of strength and core stability training versus strength and aerobic training in subjects aged over 65

Italo SANNICANDRO

Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Foggia, Foggia, Italy


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BACKGROUND: The study aims to describe the effects of two different types of training aimed at people over 65: a workout based on strength and core stability versus a workout based on strength and aerobic controlled intensity activity.
METHODS: The study targeted active adults (N.=65, 31 males, 34 females), who were randomly divided into two groups: a strength and core stability group (SCG, N.=33) with a mean age, weight, and height of 66.4±1.9 years, 63.4±2.8 kg, 169±3.5 cm, respectively; and a strength and aerobic training group (SAG, N.=32), with a mean age, weight and height of 66.2±1.8 years, 64.1±6.5 kg, 170±3.2 cm, respectively. The sample performed for 8 weeks (3 sessions a week) the two different training protocols; before and after the training period (T0 and T1), the strength of the core district, static balance ability, lower limb strength, and aerobic ability were evaluated.
RESULTS: The SCG showed statistically significant increases in the tests of core strength (P<0.01), in monopodalic balance test on both limbs (P<0.001), in the lower limbs strength (P<0.01) and in aerobic ability (P<0.001); SAG showed significant increases only in the aerobic ability (P<0.05). The comparison between SCG and SAG showed significant differences in all T1 tests in the SCG.
CONCLUSIONS: The subject over 65 effectively responds to the core district loads with positive transfer and adaptation in other motor ability; it is plausible to assume that such content should be included in the motor activity plans aimed to increasing balance ability, trunk stabilization and, consequently, in senior fall prevention plans.


KEY WORDS: Physical education and training - Postural balance - Physical fitness

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