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European Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 2017 August;1(2):37-43

DOI: 10.23736/S2532-3466.17.00115-1

Copyright © 2017 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

A retrospective study of pediatric oral and maxillofacial trauma seen in an urban level I trauma center

Marisa DAILEY 1, Natasha BHALLA 2, Malcolm B. ZOLA 1 , Rawle F. PHILBERT 1

1 Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Lincoln Medical Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA; 2 Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, NY, USA


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BACKGROUND: There is a high incidence of pediatric oral and maxillofacial trauma in the South Bronx, NY. The purpose of this study is to attempt to determine the relationship of trauma sustained to various etiological physical and social factors, using the findings to promulgate possible methods of prevention of these injuries.
METHODS: The investigators implemented a clinical retrospective cohort study referencing relevant medical records containing consultations on emergency patients aged 6 months to 18 years in a level I trauma center in the South Bronx, NY. Descriptor variables include etiology of injury, age and gender of patient, and supervision at time of injury. Outcome variables include type, frequency and localization of injury. Univariate data analysis was carried out.
RESULTS: Between November 2014 and January 2016, 512 pediatric patients who sustained oral and maxillofacial injuries presented to the Pediatric Emergency Department at Lincoln Medical Center. The male to female ratio was 1:2, and mean age was 8 years. The most prevalent etiologies were trip and fall, assault, and sports injuries, resulting in 439 soft tissue injuries, 28 dentoalveolar injuries, and 27 facial bone fractures.
CONCLUSIONS: Pediatric maxillofacial trauma patients are likely to be male, 8 years of age, and suffering from laceration. Most injuries result from trip and fall, assault or accidental contact during sports. Many of these injuries may be preventable.


KEY WORDS: Pediatrics - Trauma centers - Maxillofacial injuries - Etiology

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