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REVIEW  AORTIC DISEASE Editor’s choice • Freefree

International Angiology 2019 April;38(2):115-20

DOI: 10.23736/S0392-9590.19.04158-0

Copyright © 2019 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Gender differences on mortality and re-interventions after TEVAR for intact aneurysms of the thoracic aorta

Lara R. DIAS , José OLIVEIRA-PINTO, Armando MANSILHA

Department of Surgery and Physiology, Faculty of Medicine of Porto, Porto, Portugal



INTRODUCTION: Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has been increasingly adopted in the treatment of intact thoracic aorta aneurysms (iTAA), offering a less invasive approach with good effectiveness. Women usually present with smaller aortas, while having greater aneurysm growth rates. How sex can affect mortality and re-interventions after TEVAR for iTAA is the aim of this review.
EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: A search was conducted on PubMed databases to identify studies with gender-specific data on outcomes after TEVAR for iTAA. Primary endpoints were 30-day (or in-hospital) and mid-term mortality. Secondary endpoints were 30-day and mid-term secondary interventions.
EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS: Nine studies were included with a total of 4484 patients (2707 men and 1777 women). Thirty-day mortality ranged from 0% to 6% in female and from 1.1% to 5.3% for male patients. Three studies reported gender-specific mortality one year after TEVAR, ranging from 12% to 15.2% for female and from 8% to 16.8% in male patients. Six studies were found describing gender-related secondary intervention data.
CONCLUSIONS: Mortality after TEVAR for iTAA seems to be similar between genders. While there was a tendency for higher mortality in women, specially at 30-days, statistically significant differences were reported in only two studies. Re-interventions rates were higher in men in 4 of 6 studies, probably due to increased rates of endoleak in men, but no statically significant difference was found. Further studies with larger female population and longer follow-up are needed to firmly confirm differences among genders.


KEY WORDS: Thoracic aortic aneurysm; Endovascular procedures; Gender

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