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International Angiology 2018 December;37(6):431-6

DOI: 10.23736/S0392-9590.18.04017-8

Copyright © 2018 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Asymmetric dimethylarginine and angiogenesis: biological significance

Anna M. WIECZÓR 1, 2, Radosław WIECZÓR 1, 2 , Arleta KULWAS 1, 2, Danuta ROŚĆ 1, 2

1 Department of Pathophysiology, Ludwik Rydygier Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Faculty of Pharmacy, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Toruń, Poland; 2 Clinic of Vascular and Internal Medicine, Dr. Jan Biziel University Hospital No. 2, Bydgoszcz, Poland



Competitive inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is the main biological effect of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), i.e. the methylated derivative of L-arginine. The resulting low level of NO is becoming one of the elements of pathogenesis of numerous cardiovascular disorders, mainly related to atherosclerosis, but also other metabolic diseases including type 2 diabetes. It appears that a high level of ADMA is not only a marker of pathological conditions such as chronic kidney failure, but also a significant factor which damages the endothelium. Despite multiple studies, the mechanisms of reducing the level of ADMA, which would allow to inhibit the progression of cardiovascular diseases and effective treatment, e.g. by means of L-arginine supplementation or medicines which are lowering ADMA levels, are still unclear. Perhaps, linking ADMA with the processes of new blood cell formation (angiogenesis) will allow us to explain these multifactor mechanisms.


KEY WORDS: N,N-dimethylarginine - Physiological angiogenesis - Dimethylargininase - Atherosclerosis

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