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Gazzetta Medica Italiana - Archivio per le Scienze Mediche 2022 April;181(4):287-90

DOI: 10.23736/S0393-3660.21.04753-7

Copyright © 2021 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in periorbital cellulitis: successful therapy with clindamycin and controversy over the use of corticosteroids

Dyah A. NIRMALASARI 1 , Widya WIDITA 1, Khairuddin DJAWAD 2, Siswanto WAHAB 1, Nugrah SANTO 2, Nasrum MASSI 3

1 Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Hasanuddin University Hospital, Makassar, Indonesia; 2 Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Dr. Wahidin Sudirohusodo Hospital, Makassar, Indonesia; 3 Department of Microbiology, Hasanuddin University Hospital, Makassar, Indonesia



Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has emerged since 1960s. MRSA disseminated globally and become a leading cause of bacterial infection in both healthcare and community settings. MRSA was responsible for hospital outbreaks in many parts of the world. Cellulitis is an acute, spreading, pyogenic inflammation of the lower dermis and associated subcutaneous tissue. Cellulitis is caused by a wide range of organisms. Most cases are caused by Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus pyogenes. Clindamycin is one of modalities that can be used for skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI) with MRSA with good results. The use of corticosteroids, although controversial, could be considered in nondiabetic adult patients with cellulitis.


KEY WORDS: Vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus; Clindamycin; Adrenal cortex hormones

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