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Gazzetta Medica Italiana - Archivio per le Scienze Mediche 2021 April;180(4):102-6

DOI: 10.23736/S0393-3660.19.04170-6

Copyright © 2019 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Level of blood lactate and oxygen saturation follow-up after 90 minutes of passive recovery and 800 meters running

Hasan A. JOUDALLAH , Bashar A. SALEH

Section of Physical Education and Sport, Department of Sport Science and Health, An-Najah National University, Nablus, Palestine



BACKGROUND: The purpose of the present research was to follow-up the level of blood lactate and the oxygen saturation after 90 minutes of passive recovery and after 800 meters running for athletes.
METHODS: Nine young male athletes (years: 18.1; height: 180 cm; weight: 60 kg; fat mass: 10.5%) were randomly selected from a sample formed of 100 volunteers in Al-Najah Sport Complex in Nablus City. Before the test, all the participants joined a program that consisted of warming up, resting, blood sampling, and measuring the lactate level. Thus, blood lactate of the participants was measured before the exercise, and immediately after the exercise, and 1, 3, 5, 8,10, 15, 30, 40, 50, 60 and 90 minutes into passive recovery.
RESULTS: The results showed that during the passive recovery (up to 60 minutes after exercise) the blood lactate has decreased to 85%, while it decreased to its normal level within 90 minutes. The results have revealed having no relationship between the blood lactate and the saturation of oxygen.
CONCLUSIONS: It can be concluded that 90 minutes of passive recovery was enough for the blood to lactate back to the normal level.


KEY WORDS: Follow-up studies; Blood; Oxygen; Running

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