Home > Journals > Gazzetta Medica Italiana Archivio per le Scienze Mediche > Past Issues > Gazzetta Medica Italiana - Archivio per le Scienze Mediche 2019 October;178(10) > Gazzetta Medica Italiana - Archivio per le Scienze Mediche 2019 October;178(10):807-14

CURRENT ISSUE
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

eTOC
To subscribe PROMO
Submit an article
Recommend to your librarian
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Publication history
Reprints
Permissions
Cite this article as
Share

 

ORIGINAL ARTICLE   

Gazzetta Medica Italiana - Archivio per le Scienze Mediche 2019 October;178(10):807-14

DOI: 10.23736/S0393-3660.18.03966-9

Copyright © 2018 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Sex-related differences in determinants of self-care behaviors in adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus

Rosario CARUSO 1, Stefania DI MAURO 2, Davide AUSILI 2 , Anna M. GRUGNETTI 3, Irene BARONI 1, Federica DELLAFIORE 1, Gianluca CONTE 1, Cristina ARRIGONI 4

1 Unit of Health Professions Research and Development, San Donato Polyclinic and IRCCS, San Donato Milanese, Milan, Italy; 2 Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan, Italy; 3 San Matteo Polyclinic, IRCCS and Foundation, Pavia, Italy; 4 Section of Hygiene, Department of Public Health, Experimental and Forensic Medicine, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy



BACKGROUND: Sex-related differences in determinants of self-care in adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) were not investigated before. Knowing this could allow clinicians to better identify risk factors for inadequate self-care in male and female T1DM patients. The aim of this study was to assess sex-related differences in self-care behaviors and their determinants in adults with T1DM.
METHODS: Secondary analysis from a multicenter cross-sectional study on a sample of 181 adults with T1DM. Clinical and socio-demographic data were collected by medical records. The Self-Care of Diabetes Inventory was used to measure self-care maintenance, self-care monitoring, self-care management and self-care confidence. Self-care confidence was scored also for its internal dimensions: task-specific self-care confidence and persistence self-care confidence. A standardized 0-100 score was used for each scale where a score <70 means inadequate self-care. Multiple logistic regression models were run to identify clinical and socio-demographic determinants of self-care, splitting the sample into males (N.=70) and females (N.=111).
RESULTS: Inadequate self-care confidence was associated with inadequate self-care maintenance in both males (OR adjusted = 14.05; 95% CI: 1.017-19.423; P=0.049) and females (OR adjusted = 4.69; 95% CI: 1.285-17.118; P=0.019), but the odds was higher in men. Inadequate self-care confidence predicted inadequate self-care monitoring in men (OR adjusted = 14.04; 95% CI: 1.144-17.215; P=0.039) but not in woman (OR adjusted = 2.69; 95% CI: 0.751-9.616; P=0.129). Inadequate task-specific self-care confidence was associated to inadequate self-care management in males (OR adjusted = 1.14; 95% CI: 1.11-1.53; P=0.016) and females (OR adjusted = 1.08; 95% CI: 1.07-1.15; P=0.054), but the odds was higher in males.
CONCLUSIONS: Although self-care confidence is known to be the most important determinant of self-care in both male and female T1DM patients, it seems to have a higher influence in men. Future studies should investigate psychological and social factors mediating the effect of self-care confidence on self-care behaviors of male and female adults with T1DM.


KEY WORDS: Self care; Self-management; Self efficacy; Diabetes mellitus; Diabetes mellitus, type 1; Sex characteristics

top of page