Home > Journals > Gazzetta Medica Italiana Archivio per le Scienze Mediche > Past Issues > Gazzetta Medica Italiana - Archivio per le Scienze Mediche 2019 May;178(5) > Gazzetta Medica Italiana - Archivio per le Scienze Mediche 2019 May;178(5):287-91

CURRENT ISSUE
 

JOURNAL TOOLS

eTOC
To subscribe
Submit an article
Recommend to your librarian
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Publication history
Reprints
Permissions
Cite this article as

 

ORIGINAL ARTICLE   

Gazzetta Medica Italiana - Archivio per le Scienze Mediche 2019 May;178(5):287-91

DOI: 10.23736/S0393-3660.18.03791-9

Copyright © 2018 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: Italian

Early menopause and heavy metals

Pasquale DE FRANCISCIS 1, Viviana LA MANNA 1, Domenico LABRIOLA 1, Giuliana GENOVESE 2, Nadia MIRAGLIA 2, Antonio SCHIATTARELLA 1, Nicola COLACURCI 1, Marco TORELLA 1

1 Department of Woman, Child and General and Specialist Surgery, Obstetric-Gynecologic Center, Università degli Studi della Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Naples, Italy; 2 Unit of Occupational Medicine, Department of Experimental Medicine, Università degli Studi della Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Naples, Italy



BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between serum lead levels and early menopause, and the possible influence of environmental, occupational and lifestyle risk factors.
METHODS: Seventeen women affected by early menopause (age at menopause <40 years, amenorrhea lasting at least 6 months, FSH>25 UI/L, oestradiol levels <20 pg/ml) and 14 women in physiological menopause (age >45 years, amennorhoea lasting >12 months, FSH>30 UI/L, oestradiol <20 pg/ml). A questionnaire investigating the occupational context, life environment, and habits was administered, blood sample was obtained for serum lead determinations, a computerized bone mineralometry was performed. For statistical analysis χ2 test or t-student test was used, when appropriate.
RESULTS: The study groups were homogeneous as regards the results of the questionnaries related to the risk of exposure to chemical agents and smoking habits. Patients in early menopause showed higher blood lead levels compared to the physiological menopausal women, a greater direct correlation with time from menopause and a significant relationship with the T-score values.
CONCLUSIONS: Increasing blood levels of lead seem to be related to the progressive ovarian damage and the reduction in bone mass could explain such data.


KEY WORDS: Primary ovarian insufficiency - Metals, heavy - Lead - Bone diseases

top of page